A glut of greens

beach
Bento-ing from: › Georgia › USA
Joined: 3 Feb 2011
User offline. Last seen 1 year 20 weeks ago.

Help! I work in a community garden, and it's greens season! I already plan to make furikake with my radish and beet tops, and I've put "mixed Asian greens," arugula and turnip greens in stir fries, vegan tofu burgers, and curry, but I still have about another 4 cups of turnip greens, and more mixed Asian greens and arugula than I can eat in salads. I need more ideas of how to use them (especially the turnip greens -- could I add them to the furikake?), because I'll only be getting more over the next several weeks (including chard, red mustard, kale, and lettuces, and possibly broccoli and cabbage leaves as well).

Ideally, I'd love some recipes that could freeze well, but I can't stand mushy, overcooked greens which are so common in the Southern U.S., and frozen greens often turn mushy.

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maki
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Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
Joined: 24 Jan 2007
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Re: A glut of greens

Actually, turnip greens are what are usually used for that kind of furikake. I used radish tops because I thought they are more widely available in the US/Europe (at least in the US, turnips are often sold without the tops...) So yes, go ahead and use them like that ^_^

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beach
Bento-ing from: › Georgia › USA
Joined: 3 Feb 2011
User offline. Last seen 1 year 20 weeks ago.
Re: A glut of greens

Thanks, Maki. At least on the East Coast of the U.S., turnip greens are usually sold separately from the turnips. Radishes and beets are often sold without their tops, too (though you can find them with tops, especially organic), but I've never seen their greens sold separately.

beach
Bento-ing from: › Georgia › USA
Joined: 3 Feb 2011
User offline. Last seen 1 year 20 weeks ago.
Re: A glut of greens

Just a follow-up. We had a ton of arugula, and it bolted quickly, courtesy of a heat wave. Since it's so similar to spinach, I tried blanching it and freezing it (after squeezing as much liquid out as I could), and it worked wonderfully. I thaw a small container in the fridge and just add it to a meal when I want a bit more veggies, sometimes adding sesame sauce or walnut-miso paste. I haven't really tried to cook it into anything, since 4 huge potfuls reduced down to 4 1/2-cup containers.

The red mustard I turned into kimchi -- it was a bit limp, but it's nice for adding to recipes.

Lori
Re: A glut of greens

Greens of all sorts can pretty much be used interchangably, which can open up lots of possibilities. Instead of just salads, try adding them to a Spanish omelet, frittatta, or quiche. You can also use them to wrap onigiri, rice rolls, and even baked fish, or make a variation of stuffed cabbage rolls using say chard instead of cabbage. Chard stems- especially the rainbow chard stems, make a nice addition to a salsa or other chopped salads. Depending on their size you might want or need to steam them lightly though. As far as freezimng goes, I quick blanch all of the types you mentioned and freeze them. As a stand alone veggie, yeah- mushy and nasty. But thaw and squeeze out the extra liquid, and they will all add in to soups or quiche/frittatas/omelets without it being a big problem. For that matter, I also toss the shredded greens into spaghetti sauce, and finely chop them to add in to meatballs/meatloaf. Gets the greens into a reluctant 10 year old every time.

bronwyncarlisle
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Bento-ing from: Dunedin › New Zealand
Joined: 12 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 19 weeks ago.
Re: A glut of greens

Have you tried creamed spinach? It is sort of mushy and overcooked, but still delicious, and you can do it with chard instead. It's not terribly healthy, mind you. You cook the spinach (or chard or whatever) until it is well cooked (don't boil it in water, just let it cook in the liquid it exudes), squeeze out every drop of moisture you can, chop it really finely - in a food processor works well - then reheat it with enough cream and/or butter that it has the texture of sloppy mashed potatoes. Season with plenty of pepper and salt. It is an excellent thing to do with frozen greens, as it does not want any crispness to remain.

As I said, not the healthiest, but delicious.

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Bronwyn

My blog is Food and Shoes

beach
Bento-ing from: › Georgia › USA
Joined: 3 Feb 2011
User offline. Last seen 1 year 20 weeks ago.
Re: A glut of greens

Thanks for the ideas, Lori and Bronwyn. I forgot to mention, I also made kale chips for the first time, and they were amazing (I've actually roasted chard until it was crunchy before, which is also delicious).

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