Japanese coffee equipment

Folly
Bento-ing from: San Francisco
Joined: 5 Jul 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 23 weeks ago.

Recently i've noticed a renewed interest in pour-over coffee.
(http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/13/magazine/13Food-t-000.html)
Prominently used by Intelligenstia Coffee are Japanese drippers, carafes, and a very cool kettle by Hario. Blue Bottle Coffee in San Francisco features an 8-hour "Kyoto style" drip coffee. Last year an international Aeropress (not drip method, but my personal favorite) competition was held in Tokyo.

The Japanese coffee culture seems to have elegantly zeroed in on the design and technique of the brew. I'm planning on buying some coffee-making equipment when I am in Kyoto next month. Does anyone have any recommendations of where I should shop or sample?

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maki
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Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
Joined: 24 Jan 2007
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Re: Japanese coffee equipment

Take a look at my Kyoto map - Inoda Coffee is one of the most famous coffee houses in Kyoto, and a good place to sample coffee (and cakes, and...) I don't remember if they have coffee making equipment (they do sell beans and stuff) but they might be able to point you in the right direction anyway. (I'll be going to Kyoto in about a week and will check out more coffee places ^_^) And, I know it may sound boring, but the department stores esp. Takashimaya on Shicho Dori, has just about everything you need.

____________________________________

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- Wherever you go, there you are. -

Folly
Bento-ing from: San Francisco
Joined: 5 Jul 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 23 weeks ago.
Re: Japanese coffee equipment

Thanks, Maki. I've got your Kyoto map in my travel file and will drop by both Inoda and Ogawa Coffee. (Ogawa carries the Aeropress so I figure that they might have some interesting equipment.) Specifically, I want to price a Takahiro kettle which retails for over $130 in the U.S. This may give me an excuse go to Tokyu Hands in Osaka. ^_^

And if any reader is asking "Can Japanese coffee really be that different?" the answer is yes. Neither DH nor I is a real coffee expert, but we have both noticed a significant difference between the coffee made with the Hario cone and the French Press.

Folly
Bento-ing from: San Francisco
Joined: 5 Jul 2009
User offline. Last seen 1 year 23 weeks ago.
Follow-up

I love shopping in Japan! I found all of the all the coffee making equipment on my shopping list. While Takashimaya and Tokyu Hands had most of what I wanted, I ended up buying my pour over coffee equipment and water kettle on Dooguyasuji Street in Osaka, near Namba. It is a restaurant/kitchen supply street and had a wider selection than any of the department stores. I was able to find a kettle similar to the $130 Takahiro for ¥1795 (about $21.) I also found a good selection in Nittori, an housewares store (like our Bed and Bath stores in the U.S.) in the Kyoto suburbs.

maki
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Bento-ing from: somewhere › France
Joined: 24 Jan 2007
User offline. Last seen 3 days 2 hours ago.
Re: Follow-up

Thanks for the follow-up Folly! I actually had the chance to talk to several coffee places in Kyoto (and a couple of other places too) in April, quizzing them a bit about how they make their coffee. Overwhelmingly they said they just use a flannel drip bag filled with ground coffee, into which hot water is very slowly poured to drip through. I will write that up soonish on Just Hungry...

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