Tonkatsu first attempt

acompofelice
Bento-ing from: Houston › Texas › USA
Joined: 10 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 5 years 2 weeks ago.

Last night I made a great tonkatsu, at least *I* thought it was for my first attempt.
Kroger has some great lean pork piece that were the perfect thickness and size. I breaded them with the usual flour/egg/panko dredge and fried them in my sweet new fryolator, complete with basket.

They came out surprisingly tender, which I don't usually get from Japanese places. Even tasted good warmed up for lunch today.

I'll be trying more soon.

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Pat
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

May I ask how you heated up the oil? I've been traumatized with deep-frying at home, but would like to try again. What heat setting is appropriate for electric stove? My stove heat settings go from 1 to 8 (max.)

Thanks!

iya
Bento-ing from: Hudson › Ohio › USA
Joined: 16 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 5 years 19 weeks ago.
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

My tonkatsu attempt went very well, too! The most important thing I'd learned was the cutting of the connective tissue so the pork slice stays nice and flat (and not curled up into a bowl). This means I could just fry the tonkatsu on a little oil instead of deep frying (I am trying to retire my deep fryer), and everything gets cooked nice and even. Even my husband, who disdained pork and preferred beef, was wowed by it, particularly by its state of non-dehydratedness :P !

Did you happen to pound your pork as a tenderizing means? Or did you just plain coat and fry?

Pat - can't help you with the deep frying part, sorry, as I use a deep fryer and not the stove. When I fry on the stove, though, I turn it on to high, and when it's hot enough, I turn it down to medium so I don't trigger the smoke alarm XD That would be bad.

Pat
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

Hi, iya. So I don't have to deep fry to make tonkatsu? When you said "a little oil", how much is that in terms of depth from bottom of the pan? I'd like to avoid deep frying at all costs, because it caught fire before. That was 15 yrs ago and while we were able to put it out, I've been afraid ever since. Lately, I got many recipes that require deep frying here and there...and it's killing me. I think, hey, maybe it's time I try again. Thanks for your suggestion.

yamikuronue
Bento-ing from: Manchester › UK
Joined: 25 Sep 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 51 weeks ago.
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

I pan-fry just about everything calling for deepfrying, including chicken katsu and tonkatsu - it doesn't turn out exactly the same, but it still seems delicious. I use a little more oil than other recipes, but otherwise just pan-fry them normally.

"Stop having the boring tuna; stop having the boring life" - Vince Offer

Balifly
Bento-ing from: Vancouver › British Columbia › Canada
Joined: 22 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 14 weeks 2 days ago.
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

You two are just an egg beat away from making katsu don.

Might want to add some fried onion to it too, yummy !!!

Balifly

iya
Bento-ing from: Hudson › Ohio › USA
Joined: 16 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 5 years 19 weeks ago.
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

I actually have made oyakodon, the chicken version. I love katsudon, but the hubby doesn't, and I do my best to accommodate his tastes and preferences with food. I'm not a fan of making different stuff for him and myself, when cooking more of something and splitting works so much better (for me). I like mine with onions AND leeks :D

I'm really loving this independence from "Japanese" restos.. they're so expensive, and not always worth it.

acompofelice
Bento-ing from: Houston › Texas › USA
Joined: 10 Feb 2009
User offline. Last seen 5 years 2 weeks ago.
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

Ok so here's a clarification...

I don't like frying at home either, but I got this item for Christmas:
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?order_num=-1&SKU=14185216

Its a fantastic mini-fryer and works great. It has a basket in which I was able to do two pieces at once. Very easy temperature control and very clear. No splatters or smoking. I used peanut oil and left enough to cover 1 inch above the bottom of the basket, which is about two inches of oil total.

I used pork slices that were already about 1/4 thick (pre-done at the butcher counter of my local grocery). THey had limited fat, so I didn't trim them at all. They didn't curl or anything.
As for a method, I dredged in flour (shook off excess), dredged in egg wash, then in panko crumbs. I let them rest for a few minutes, then fried for 2 mins in 350 degree oil. Comes out perfect.

Hopefully this answers your questions.. Ask any more :)

Pat
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

Thank you so much! That's cool little appliance I didn't know existed. It'd be especially good for me since I cook for 1-2 persons.

Aleria
Bento-ing from: Vancouver › British Columbia › Canada
Joined: 20 Jan 2009
User offline. Last seen 2 years 44 weeks ago.
Re: Tonkatsu first attempt

About deep frying on the stove - a neat trick is to find out what temperature your oil is supposed to be at, look at its position on your oven dial, and then put your stove element dial at approximately the same area.
I don't have a deep fryer, but I like deep frying in an electric skillet. Deep fryers intimidate me for some reason.

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