"tarako" etymology?

rehfilet
Bento-ing from: › Germany
Joined: 11 Aug 2009
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i thought "tarako" was a japanese word, "tara" being cod and "ko" because it's eggs, but now i stumbled over this:
in modern greek, there's a product called "avgotaraho". i looked it up, the name is derived from coptic "outarakhon", which apparently comes from the byzantine greek word for "pickled fish eggs".
that's weird, isn't it? tarako vs outarakhon.. it's pretty much the same product, too. both languages have a logical explanation for their word. is it just a coincidence?
on the other hand, a pickled product keeps well and both countries knew how to build and navigate a ship..
that's a romantic thought. can anyone help me out with science?

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Loretta
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

I don't know the etymology, but it might, possibly, perhaps, maybe not be a coincidence.
The reason I feel this is that one of the 'top three' delicacies (chinmi) of the Edo court was karasumi, fish roe that is very similar to Botargo http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botargo (what I know as 'hueva de mujol' in Spanish - grey mullet fish roe).
The method of preserving karasumi is supposed to have its origins in the Eastern Mediterranean and sailors did get around a lot (and, I believe, much more widely than they are given credit for - I buy into the theory that the Basques from Spain were quietly making very profitable cod fishing trips to the East Coast of North America way before Columbus got there - dried cod/bacalao was invaluable for long journeys)
But I'm probably as 'romantic' about this as you are (especially as karasumi is credited as being a relatively recent import and that wikipedia page I linked to says that botargo comes from the word outarakhon also - my not-so-romantic self says it is a coincidence).

bronwyncarlisle
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

I'm pretty sure it's the "avgo" bit that means eggs in Greek though. "Avgolemono" is an egg and lemon soup.

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maki
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

I've wondered about the etymology of 'taramasalata' myself, since it's made with salted fish roe...

Incidentally, today for lunch I had this bread that was on special (20% off! hey!), called 'tarama-pan' (pan=bread)...it was a soft roll with a piece of canned tuna with mentaiko (spicy version of tarako) spread over it and baked...it was um, interesting.

Incidentally (and this is going off on a tangent), I had that tarama-pan in a bakery/cafe inside a subway station mall in Yokohama with my mother, with coffee (coffee was ok, tarama-pan..not so much). My back was towards the bread display shelves, but my mother was sitting opposite and had a good view. She suddenly leans over and says to me "Look at that person's panties!" I was like "huh?" and turned around...and see the back of this rather tall woman with a very very short pleated skirt and knee high socks, leaning over looking at the bread...with bright red panties showing. Now, high school girls here tend to dress like that (or rather they arrange their school uniforms like that...hiking up their skirts way high almost to the crotch, paired with knee socks, big patch of bare thigh showing between). But older women never, ever dress like that, and this person did not look like a teenager. Anyway, we forgot about her and finished our bread and coffee and took the escalator down to the platform, and I see the same person on the escalator before me. Umm...it was a guy. He had heavy eye makeup on and lipstick and everything, and I think false eyelashes, but it was definitely a guy with a bit of stubble and an adam's apple and all.

So yeah, it was an interesting lunch.

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bronwyncarlisle
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

When I was at school in the late 60s-early 70s we used to dress like that too. Our school uniform had to be no more than four inches above the knee, so to be fashionably "mini" we came up with all sorts of stratagems. the most common was to hoist the uniform up over the belt, but you could also pin it up at the shoulders and do without the belt.

Stephanie
Bento-ing from: San Lorenzo › California › USA
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

I was always screwed on the dress code for school. The shorter girls could wear shorts and skirts pretty much all they liked because the rule was that your shorts/skirt must be longer than your arms at your sides. I would get the longest clothes I could and I would still get harassed by administrators for dressing inappropriately, long arms and legs come with a 6' tall frame. So eventually my mother made it clear that I do my best to comply with dress code but she would not be buying clothes more expensive clothes from the women's department that she would need to get altered to fit my teenage body (no hips and a 38" inseam) nor would she make me suffer through 100+ degree weather in jeans. Needless to say the school administrators eventually gave up trying to enforce the dress code on me :)

rehfilet
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

hooray for other genders! she was probably enjoying the attention.

maki
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

She probably was enjoying the attention...she was smiling happily in freezing cold weather.

But I could have done without the pan-chira (glimpse of panties).

Loretta
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

I'm all for gender malleability - Yeay! - but I do not like being unwittingly wrenched into a grown adult's exhibitionist fantasies.

pan-chira in a pan-ya = Eeeuuuwww!!!

rehfilet
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Re: "tarako" etymology?

she certainly didn't get a chance to wear a short skirted school uniform in public when she was a teenager, being a boy.
i think panty flashing is funny because people think it's very naughty, but actually you can't see anything that can't be seen at the local swimming pool. panties are not that special, we all wear them every day.
(or should. i was once flashed by some scottish soccer fans in kilts. brrrrrrrr. i'd rater look at a schoolgirl with bright red panties peeking out from under the skirt, no matter what age or gender!)

Re: "tarako" etymology?

Tarako (鱈子?), in Japanese cuisine, is a salted roe food, usually made from Alaska pollock,[1] although tara (鱈?) actually means cod in Japanese.

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